First Early potatoes are in the ground

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Reception and year 1 have started this seasons potato planting. We decided to plant a little earlier than usual as we wanted to see if it makes a difference to the yield. Here are some of the interesting  pieces of information we have been learning about.

Potato facts

Potato plants are herbaceous perennials that grow about 60 cm (24 in) high, depending on variety, with the leaves dying back after flowering, fruiting and tuber formation. (The tuber is the part you eat)

Did you know

  1. that there are about 5,000 potato varieties worldwide and some are blue.
  2. Potatoes are some times called spuds. The word spud traces back to the 16th century.
  3. The Irish Potato Famine (1845–49) devastated Ireland’s population. Nearly one million Irish people died, and as many as two million emigrated to countries such as the United States.

Potato

noun  po·ta·to  \pə-ˈtā-tō\

Definition of potato

plural po·ta·toes

The thick edible usually rounded underground tuber of a widely grown South American plant that is eaten as a vegetable

Uses

Potatoes can be prepared in many ways: skin-on or peeled, whole or cut up, with seasonings or without. The only requirement involves cooking to swell the starch granules. Most potato dishes are served hot, but some are first cooked, then served cold for example potato salad and potato chips /crisps

Potatoes are boiled between 10 and 25 minutes, depending on size and type, to become soft.

Other uses for potatoes

  • They are used as food for domestic animals.
  • Potato `Starch is used in the food industry as, for example, thickeners and binders of soups and sauces, in the textile industry, as adhesives, and for the manufacturing of papers and boards.
  • Potato skins, along with honey, are a folk remedy for burns in India. Burn centers in India have experimented with the use of the thin outer skin layer to protect burns while healing

Reception

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